“Who, What, Why?” Getting Acquainted with the Digital Humanities (Part One #LANS2016 Invited Talk)

The following material corresponds with a talk I’m giving at the Leadership Alliance National Symposium in Stamford, CT on July 30, 2016. Students present at the talk can follow along and explore various DH projects via this blog post. Feel free to tweet as we go using the LANS hashtag #LANS2016 and @secornish. You can also leave comments on this post about the session.

Part I: Introductions and Posing the Questions

Questions that drive my research are:

1) Who decides who or what gets to be remembered and who or what gets forgotten? In other words, who decides what goes into physical archives to be preserved? What about digital archives? Who will manage the archives and keep them sustainable?

2) What social, historical, political, and cultural contexts inform the work and lives of the writers I research? How does learning about the past inform my understandings of our present?

3) What’s the “So what?”? What am I adding to the study of literature, culture, and the humanities by doing the research I do?

4) How can I best present my findings so that other scholars can use them in their research? How can I best teach my findings so that my students may learn from them?

5) What might my research reveal if I find new ways to express it?

Digital tools and platforms provide new ways to express our research. Thus, the Digital Objects we make with these tools help to preserve and promote new ideas, discoveries, and humanistic inquiry. 

“The Machine is Us/ing Us” by Michael Wesch (YouTube, May 8, 2007)

Part II: Debates and Definition of a Practice

What does it mean to practice DH? How can the Digital Humanities help us better work with our materials and reveal our research? Let’s take a look at what the practitioners have to say about it.

What is the “so what?” What am I doing with the things I make to further humanistic inquiry? Am I being thoughtful about representation of important issues like equality, justice, and ethics? Am I reifying the status quo in research and scholarship, or am I actively making meaningful contributions that might have the power to change that conversation?

Let’s look at some digital projects. This assortment represents sites that I use, but there are many projects out there that will certainly correspond with your own research interests.

ABOPublic

Digital Harlem

Hypercities: Thick Mapping in the Digital Humanities

The Internet Archive

Modernist Journals Project

Orlando: Women’s Writing in the British Isles from the Beginnings to the Present

Browse through two or three of these sites.

  1. Who is the site’s audience?
  2. How might one use the site?
  3. How intuitive is the interface?
  4. What questions does it bring up for you?

Part III: Collaboration

What, in your experience, is important for good, productive, and innovative collaboration?

Let’s take a look at how my students worked collaboratively to produce a blog and two Scalar books during the Spring semester of 2016.

Digital Humanities Playground

A course site for ENG 395 at the University of Northern Colorado (Spring 2016)

 

 

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Author: sarahcornish

Assistant Professor at the University of Northern Colorado. Working in 20th century American and British Literature + Digital Humanities, Psychogeography, Urban, Film, Gender Studies.

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